conflict and consensus

Finding New Ground

Many of us want change in our lives, in our relationships with others, with nature. Or, we want to slow or stop changes that we view as negative. Yet we continue to believe that if people only had better information, they would change.

Through a great deal of experience, Bob Chadwick has learned how to manage change by creating a different environment, a different context for our interactions with each other. One in which deeper learning, and changing one's beliefs, becomes safe and creative of new possibility.

Many people have experienced this kind of facilitation, and know how transformative it can be. To do it may still feel risky, different, or challenging to traditional power, agendas, or expectations. The rich stories in this book will build your confidence and skills.

If you want change, use what this book can teach you. Click the picture to order.

Beyond conflict to consensus: an introductory learning manual

If you have the desire or the intent to confront and resolve conflict, this manual can help teach you the skills. Every technique or question in here has purpose. In trying to understand the purpose, you will better understand conflict in human nature.

The talking circle is the centerpiece of the consensus process because it encourages respectful listening. If you can only adopt one thing from this manual, adopt the talking circle.

Who will take care of the land? Challis team begins to design a future for their community

from Patterns of Choice, 1998

CUSTER COUNTY, IDAHO--Two years ago, rancher Ted O'Neil said he felt "goddam bleak" about his future. In a recent meeting he said, "You know what I feel about today? I wouldn't go back to the old way even if we didn't have to do this."

Change and loss

Change is constant. Like death and taxes, it is inevitable. It is a paradox that must be faced and accepted if we are to be prepared for it emotionally and practically -- if we are to live fully and grow.

Changes are endings and beginnings -- a time when the body responds both physically and emotionally to the process of separation from the old, the certain, the comfortable, and the entry into the new, the unknown, and the feared.

If we have time to react, a person responds to changes in these stages:

Exploring conflict: the process

by Bob Chadwick, Consensus Associates

PO Box 235 Terrebonne, OR 97760 (541) 548-7112

WORKSHOPS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

EXPLORING CONFLICT - THE BASIC PROCESS

LEARNING MANUAL 1

Spokane, WA

September 24-27, 2002

Prepared By:

CONSENSUS ASSOCIATES

PO Box 235

Terrebonne, OR 97760

(503) 548-7112




WORKSHOPS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

Exploring conflict and unresolved conflict

The participants were redistributed into six new groups, each exploring the concept of conflict. Half the groups explored the definition of conflict and how they felt about it, and the other half exploring the evidence that unresolved conflict exists in their environment.

This activity redistributes the participants into new relationships. It is often based on concerns raised by participants during the grounding.

Consensus learning manual, part 3: the process

THE QUESTIONS:

1. THE GROUNDING:


* "INTRODUCE YOURSELF AND YOUR RELATIONSHIP TO EDUCATION."

* "WHAT ARE YOUR EXPECTATIONS OF THIS INSTITUTE?"

* "TELL US HOW YOU FEEL ABOUT BEING HERE"

INSIGHT ON GROUNDING (Page 23)


2. THE GREETING CIRCLE:


3. AN ADAPTIVE LEARNING PROCESS


* HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT IT?

The most serious problem of democracy today

Former pollster Dan Yankelovich says that the most serious problem facing democracy today is that the public feels isolated from the political process.

Democracy and power

We have moved in this country from representative democracy to participative democracy. It doesn't mean that you participate only with those who think like you do. You have to participate with those who you hate, with whom you have that strong a feeling. Because if you don't include them, it's not participative.

Underlying every single conflict is power -- who gets it, who doesn't get it. You have to know how to balance power, to empower, to create an environment where I empower myself.

Managing power

We are pleased to continue our serialization of Bob Chadwick's learning manuals, which help teach people to confront and resolve conflict. In issues 1-6 we reprinted Beyond Conflict to Consensus: An Introductory Learning Manual.

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